Digital Twin Technologies: The Game Changer in 2020

Have you heard about the latest technology trend “digital twin?” While it is not a new idea, the term has been gaining huge momentum in the modern era. The concept has been in existence since the initial days of in-depth space exploration. However, with improved connectivity along with the advent of high-end technologies like IoT and Virtual Reality (VR), the overall hype around the technology of the digital twin has been spreading lately.

It has been revealed that the digital twin technology is expected to grow from $1.8 million to reach around $13.5 million by the time of 2025. 

What is the Digital Twin Technology?

A digital twin can be stated in terms of a visual representation of some physical system, process or object. The fact that makes this technology so interesting and functional is that real-time data from meters, sensors and other relevant sources can be utilised for informing the respective digital copies of the given assets in a typical virtual space. This allows for the overall monitoring as well as analysis and opportunities for optimisation, future simulation and machine learning.

Importance of the Digital Twin 

For the upcoming future, the concept of the digital twin helps in providing the most value in equipment management. The digital twin is also capable of providing property managers as well as building engineers the capability of:

  • Visualising and monitoring building equipment along with systems in real-time
  • Connecting contrasting systems and promoting traceability through a common digital thread
  • Optimising building operations with top-end predictive analysis
  • Troubleshooting equipment from some distance

The given insights into the inner system of buildings and how the same can be improved could imply major savings in maintenance repairs, operations, utility consumption, and optimised IoT-based asset performance.

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Outbreak of the Digital Twin Technology

Just like other high-end technologies such as blockchain, the technology of the digital twin is also estimated to be utilised in a myriad of industry verticals. The overall use of digital twins is going to extend much beyond the concept of commercial real estate – reaching far into other industries including city planning, manufacturing, healthcare and marketing, to name a few. 

As per a recent study, it is estimated that around 21 billion connected endpoints and sensors by the end of 2020 will be existing for the digital twin technology. While the overall assurance of such predictions are yet to be analysed, businesses are still excited about what this would imply for the commercial real estate industry. 

For example, when digital twins are amalgamated with VR technology, the natural interaction and immersive views that VR technology has to offer might ensure tweaking designs to make the same less cumbersome and more intuitive. At the same time, simulations can be implemented in real time for observing what the given product in action would appear – enabling rapid-speed design phases. 

We recently interviewed digital transformation influencer Antonio Grasso. In our chat Grasso explores the opportunities of the digital twin for businesses in the future. Read more about the digital twin and our chat with Antonio here

How VR will drive supply chain

Virtual Reality is one of the fastest growing disruptive technologies. At the cusp of industry 4.0, enterprises are keenly using such innovative tech to provide enhanced solutions. With the arrival of consumer-friendly and affordable headsets or virtual reality glasses, VR tech has gone mainstream.

Supply chain management is one of the many fields that VR is revolutionising. Excerpts from the recent Deloitte report on ‘Utilizing virtual reality to drive supply chain innovation’:

VR can improve supply chain management in four main areas:

  1. product and process design
  2. data and process visualisation
  3. employee collaboration
  4. experience-based learning

VR is of big interest to companies with complex product development process and a need to globalise their collaboration. This is mainly because VR for enterprises simplifies or enhances an existing process rather than introduce a whole process. Furthermore, hardware and software capabilities in the tech have improved greatly, leading to easier adoption.

Deloitte recommends enterprises to begin with small pilots to test and validate applications that could have immediate benefit and scalability.

For example, VR can be used to superimpose important information directly onto the windshield. Without glancing at a handheld device, drivers can see alternate routes, blocked roads and traffic snags. Information about the load can be seen without the need to stop, climb into the back of the truck, and see what’s going on. For example, a driver carrying a temperature controlled load can see if there’s an issue with the thermostat and if the temperature is approaching a predetermined danger zone.

‘As VR applications continue to expand and prices continuously decrease, the VR market alone could reach up to $48.5 billion by 2025.’

Primary potential benefits of VR

A primary value driver for organizations is VR’s interactive visualization capability. Companies are starting to leverage the technology within their design organizations to enhance CAD functionality and engineer employee engagement. The VR-enhanced designs allow for visualization capabilities previously unavailable; this allows product engineers, architects, and designers to rapidly shift through multiple designs and evaluate them on the spot. Automotive OEMs and large construction firms are partnering with design software companies and VR hardware manufacturers to create these immersive experiences.

 

 

 

Future of enterprise management

Virtual reality can drive true transformation in supply chain and operations. However, like every major change, it requires a strategic approach to begin deploying within a company. Leaders need to understand that shifting toward a completely new, virtual environment mandates a shift in culture toward innovation, openness, and collaboration.

The blog is a rewritten excerpt from Deloitte.

Images courtesy: Deloitte

 

Enterprise Reality

Appearition in association with TiE, Chennai will host an Exclusive seminar on ‘Enterprise Reality’

We have Mark Sage, Executive Director, AREA and Rod Smith, Platform Sales, Appearition talking on AR trends and Change Management.

The session will be moderated by Vivek Aiyer, Founder-CEO, Appearition.

Come, join us for an evening of discussion on AR and Change Management!

Send us an email to register for the event – info@appearition.com 

 

Augmented Reality – A snapshot of the market

Augmented Reality for Enterprises

Augmented Reality has been changing the face of enterprise sector. From enhancing work efficiency to improving skills, AR does it all. Take a look at some game-changing numbers:

 

Six applications of AR in Manufacturing

Manufacturing, generally, is a highly skilled and elaborate process. This leaves very little room for trial, testing and error rectification. Augmented Reality has proven to eliminate these three across various manufacturing processes.

A look at some process enhancements in this field:

Assembly

This process involves putting together several hundred or thousands of components as per a sequence. Assembling spans across products small or big. From smartphone assembly to aircraft, mis-arranging a small piece would result in an error. AR enables visualising of these parts to the smallest range. Boeing currently uses an AR app to facilitate assembly has had over 90% perfection in operation enhancement using it.

Maintenance

Apart from assembly, AR can be used to aid in the maintenance of machinery and equipment. Mitsubishi Electric has been developing maintenance-support technology using augmented reality based on a 3D model that enables users to confirm the order of inspection on an AR display and then enter inspection results with their voice.

AR/VR can reduce workflow time on inspection & maintenance and assist in detecting errors. Since 2011, Airbus has been using AR technology to improve efficiency in its quality control. Using its Supply Augmented Reality Tool (SART), Airbus employees can use visual overlay images on real systems to identify the faulty parts for repair. These kind of AR activities save time in creating an incident report and follow ups by enabling on-the spot solution.

(Image courtesy of Vital Enterprises)

Training

90% of what’s transmitted to the brain is visual memory. This basic function enables AR to provide the unprecedented edge over traditional paper and print training manuals. Also, this facilitates self-training for trainees as opposed to vocational physical induction. At a Boeing training, trainees using AR completed the work 35% faster than the trainees using traditional 2-D blue prints.

Quality Assurance

Metrology in general, and quality assurance (QA) more specifically, offers numerous potential applications for AR. SlashGear reported on a pilot program running at a Porsche assembly plant in Leipzig, Germany. A demonstration by the company showed Porsche technicians using augmented reality as a tool in the quality assurance process.

The basic idea is that quality professionals can take photos of parts or assemblies on vehicles under inspection, and then compare those images to ones provided by the company’s suppliers via an augmented reality overlay. Features that are out of specification can be highlighted by the overlay, enabling the Porsche technicians to identify the issue quickly and intuitively.

Airbus has been using a “Mixed Reality Application,” or MiRA, to integrate digital mock-ups into production environments, giving assembly workers access to complete 3D models of the aircraft under production. MiRA reduced the time required to inspect the 60,000 – 80,000 brackets in the A380 fuselage from 3 weeks to 3 days.

Logistics

Often, it takes time to locate the right aisle/stack whilst arranging or onboarding goods. In 2015, Logistics firm DHL tested an AR program to manage stacking at a Netherlands inventory. The pilot proved that AR ‘vision picking’ resulted in 25% increase in efficiency. The staff worked with AR glasses to assist the picking task. They reported faster and error free task completion using this.

(Photo Courtesy: DHL)

Customer Support

Xerox is using AR to connect remote technical experts directly with customers. This has increased by 76% the rate at which technical problems are resolved by customers without any on-site help, cutting travel costs for Xerox and minimizing downtime for customers. They witnessed customer satisfaction rates rise to 95%.

 

(With excerpts and photos from engineereing.com)

 

AR and VR the next big thing in the industry

Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) are often believed to provide digital and off-field technology solutions. Generally, they are perceived as a tool for marketing, digital branding, audience engagement, education, retail promotion etc. AR and VR can be used in several sectors and context from manufacturing to fire and safety operations. Yes, AR and VR can be applied for several such Field Service Management (FSM) based work.

Manufacturing:

AR and VR have a vast use case in this field. AR programs can be designed for product training, controlled simulations, emergency response and evacuation, remote access vision etc. AR/VR supports in cost reduction and saves man-power on these activities by enabling self-instructional images/videos. Apart from creating an immersive experience, it creates a personal walkthrough assistant for people out in the field.

Source: bit.ly/2EwNfsW 

 

Fire & Safety and Emergency Response (ER):

AR/VR can transform the way we respond to an emergency. In some cases, information on people trapped inside building can be checked via sensors and visual over-lays. For Fire & Safety evacuations, AR/VR provides instructional walk-throughs and directs to access points proving information on their current situation.

Ship Building:

Building heavy machinery and ships are very time consuming and requires large volumes of handbooks to train, record procedures for cross-reference. Using AR to prompt tools and display the procedure to assemble them saves several man-hours and creates an almost-error free assembly of the products.

Inspection and Maintenance:

For some business as usual, AR/VR can reduce workflow time on inspection & maintenance and assist in detecting errors. Since 2011, Airbus has been using AR technology to improve efficiency in its quality control. Using its Supply Augmented Reality Tool (SART), Airbus employees can use visual overlay images on real systems to identify the faulty parts for repair. These kind of AR activities save time in creating an incident report and follow ups by enabling on-the spot solution.

Inventory Management:

Often, it takes time to locate the right aisle/stack whilst arranging or onboarding goods. In 2015, Logistics firm DHL tested an AR program to manage stacking at a Netherlands inventory. The pilot proved that AR ‘vision picking’ resulted in 25% increase in efficiency. The staff worked with VuzixM100 that used Ubimax’s xPick software to assist the task. Staffs reported faster and error free task completion using these.

Source: http://bit.ly/1A9Tk5J

Get in touch with us to know about using AR for your business!

Intern series: How to land an internship in a tech company

Vivienne Zhu is a Commerce & Law student at Monash University currently interning with Appearition’s head office in Melbourne.

How’d I get land my first internship? By telling Tushar about my lonely yet, solution oriented solo hike on the snow covered Bukhansan Mountain in Korea. This is only half true. My passion for marketing, previous work in a NFP and willingness to step out of my comfort zone shone through against many other candidates.

Landing an internship in a tech company without tech knowledge?

As someone who has never learnt about IT, augmented reality or coding, it’s quite different and interesting to work in this environment. Often others in the office use a lot of technical terms that I don’t necessarily understand, but I’m always free to ask (or Google in my spare time). However, the technical jargon that comes along in a tech space naturally becomes more comprehensible.

As a marketing intern, my first few weeks consisted primarily of competitive analysis and events research. However, I was soon trusted to start my own social media campaigns on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. I constantly put my hand up to take on opportunities within my capabilities – e.g. filming and editing a video for a client. This allowed my peers to see that I was capable of more than what they initially thought.

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In my first three months, I’ve had opportunities to work on new projects and learn more practical marketing skills (social media analysis, Google Adwords and driving B2B Marketing). Whilst I am not majoring or studying marketing, I am continuously developing my skills in this digital age of marketing. Creating content and following trends is very important. Whilst I’ve learnt so much about marketing, I’ve also learnt about the intricacies of augmented reality.

What is augmented reality?

Before this internship. I had no idea what augmented reality was. Prior to my interview, I was furiously researching about the industry. AR is still quite new and my only touch point was my Snapchat obsession (sorry to disappoint but I never got into the Pokemon Go fad). I’ve experimented with Appearition’s apps, and now understand the solutions they provide for businesses. AR goes far beyond consumer capabilities, but is likely to have a great impact in the workplace in the future.rgea

I look forward to the coming weeks and potential projects I’ll be involved in, and I know this is just the beginning for my personal augmented reality journey.

By the way, I wasn’t completely alone on the mountains. I strategically followed three senior Korean hikers who took me on the hike of a lifetime. At the end of the day, it’s all about strategy, passion and drive.

If you’d like to follow my work – like our Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn pages!

 

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IndustryAR: Augmented Reality Transport Improving Daily Life

Augmented reality transport has helped tourists navigate train lines, assist cyclists in urban traffic and improve logistics transportation optimization. However, there is still significant room to develop in this industry and it will do so over the coming years.

Augmented reality on roads

big_livemap2In the UK, there are similar developments with bicycle helmets. Through augmented reality transport, safety is promoted by ensuring cyclists maintain a head-up stance, as the pertinent information appears in their visor, and not down on a smartphone.

As an added bonus, a feature called blind spot visualization is being explored. If developed and added, this could greatly reduce the incidence of heavy vehicles cutting into to bicycle paths, a major cause of cycling fatalities.

Yet another perk is a feature that could suggest bike routes that are less polluted by heavy traffic. An especially helpful feature for most industrialized, heavily trafficked cities. And of course, navigation would be the backbone of such an app.

Augmented reality in logistics

AR applications can also be a big asset to logistics companies by optimizing transportation. Applications could help drivers by improvingaugmented_reality
navigational efficiency and safety. AR could also help workers identify, at a glance, if a particular shipment is the correct one, or if it meets the required import/export regulations.

These are processes often take a long time to perform manually, and they run up costs. In a nutshell, AR has the potential to take a lot of the ‘grunt’ out of grunt work and help move things along more smoothly and efficiently.

While AR is finding some expression in the transportation industry, it is still early stages. There are plenty of applications still in development. However, this is less of a limitation and more of an indication of a vast future potential.

Image source (1) (2) (3)

 

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