Magnify World 2018

It was a lot of fun being a part of Magnify World 2018. Team Appearition put up an exclusive stall and Mark Hillebrand, our Head of Professional Services, was part of a panel discussion on Education and Training.

We had several visitors at our stall, excited to know more about the disruptive technology – Augmented Reality.

A snapshot of our two days at Magnify World:

Pics 1, 2, 3, 4: Setup

Table – check
Demo – check
Screens – check
Gadgets- check
Scenes from our setup mode

Simon and Dhaya moments before the event started

Simon demonstrating the use of AR glasses

Busy stall day! Exciting voices who experienced AR for the first time, innovators who explored the use of AR for their business

Vivek (Brendan in the background) in conversation with stall visitors


Mark Hillebrand during his panel discussion

And, that’s a wrap! Look who spoke about our work:

 

 

 

IOT: How a connected world will look like

Internet of Things (IoT) – the technology that enables devices to connect with each other, providing a seamless inter-device communication. The technology helps in data management, informed decision making, track and manage the data. IoT provides businesses with operational efficiency and workforce productivity.

 

The explosion of smart devices will add ‘a ginormous’ amount of data. For instance, a sensor on a single Boeing aircraft jet engine can generate about 20 terabytes of data per hour. So what will happen several billion devices start generating several zettabytes of data? Gartner predicts that over 20 billion devices will be connected by 2020.

 

 

About 65% of the enterprises are set to adopt IoT by 2020. This shift would mean that more than 10% of new IoT products from traditional industries will be headed by the Chief Innovation Officer (CIO).

 

By 2020, Gartner estimates internet-connected things will outnumber humans 4-to-1, creating new dynamics for marketing, sales and customer service.

So, what else can we expect in the near future?

 

Source: Gartner, Intel

How will technology shape learning?

A look at the trends and impact of digital transformation and possibilities of AR in education and training

Technology has become an imperative part of education in the past decade. The introduction of immersive technologies meant interactive classes and unparalleled experience in learning. A study conducted by Justin Tosco, a master’s student at Saint Catherine University, shows that students prefer lessons that use technology.

The study found that there was 16% accuracy in short answers and increase engagement for students taught with the aid of technology.

We are currently living in a fully-digital world with average adults spending over 5-7 hours a day on the internet. And Generation Z – a popular name for today’s school-going kids, have grown along with this digital boom. This makes them quite familiar with the use of technology in everyday activities.

Research by Geer and Sweeney (2012) showed that the use of a variety of media applications to explain concepts increased the understanding and supported greater collaboration between students.

AR provides an efficient way to represent a model that needs visualization. This immersive technology provides seamless interaction between the real and virtual world. Furthermore, it facilitates field visits within four walls, thereby increasing visual retention.

Some key benefits of adopting technology in education:

  1. Improves knowledge retention (taps the potential of visual memory)

    Students learn multiple subjects at school and need to remember them all. Technology like Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality bring content to life. Studies suggest that visual memory appeals to mind within 0.01 second! Students learn as they see, thereby sub-consciously retaining knowledge.

  2. Induces interest in students (provides the wide platform for students to self-exploration)

Generally, teaching is believed to be the mode of acquiring knowledge or learning. Immersive technologies facilitate self-learning, in a fun and engaging manner. Subjects like History, which are narrative and quite visual, can be easily learned through these.

  1. Facilitates holistic learning (caters to visual, auditory and speech sensory)

As a study rightly says, use of technology involves real-world problems, current informational resources, simulations of concepts, and communication with professionals in the field. In addition, learning using technology is believed to complement the traditional forms of teaching and learning. This promotes the visual, auditory and speech senses simultaneously.

  1. Reduce classroom disruption (aids students with limited attention span, engages a big class)

Learning and paying attention to new concepts are challenging for children with autism, down syndrome, etc. AR and VR have proven to improve their attention span, aid in expressing their self and improves their interactive behaviour. Furthermore, these technologies act as students’ centre of attraction, thereby reducing any possible distraction.

  1. Improves mastery of abstract subjects (theorems, certain chemical compounds, food chain)

Learning about obtuse triangle or explanation of food chain through mere theory makes a student’s life difficult. These are abstract concepts and are understood better when demonstrated. Augmented Reality and other similar technologies bring such abstract subjects to life with their overlay and video demonstration capacities.

  1. Visualisation of theoretical concepts (Eg: air pressure, Archimedes principle, types of clouds)

Learning by viewing animated objects leads to better understanding and simplifies what is taught. Immersive technology such as Virtual Reality can enable students to feel or experience some theoretical concepts like air pressure, or the working of Archimedes principle.

  1. Simplification of complex subjects (table of elements – their qualities, geometric formulae)

We have discussed on technologies ability to simplify learning. Let us understand this further:

The introduction of powerpoint slides or projectors meant students had a visual aid to break-down important points while being taught. Whereas, some of these technologies weren’t accessible always and by all students. With high levels of mobile penetration to Gen-Z, today’s technology like 3D learning, AR, VR, MR and AI are all accessible at the touch of a button on a mobile.

These technologies enable re-visiting and learning a concept at an individual time and pace. They further act as a personal tutor for students, walking them through every step.

  1. Objectification of content (providing a direction to what is being taught)

History and Civics are two subjects with relatively easy concepts to understand but can be quite monotonous if learnt theoretically. Use of technology in such subjects enable objectification of content and provides a skeletal frame to what is taught. For instance, when learning about legislature or an assembly, students can play-out scenarios of a majority, coalition or stages in creating a law. These are effective methods of teaching and enables them to grasp concepts better.

Advantages of AR in Education

  • Supports seamless interaction between real and virtual environments and allows the use of a tangible interface metaphor for object manipulation
  • Provide instructors with a way to strengthen students’ understanding in the classroom by augmenting physical props with virtual annotations and illustrations
  • Creates a learning experience that is linked to the formal classroom, so that student(s) can learn outside of class hours and outside of school limits
  • Enables the visualization of interactions among amino acids and protein building processes as static 2D/3D images and 3D dynamic images (animations)

(Source: University Teknologi Malaysia Research)

Applications in medical training

AR and VR are widely being used to train medical students in a number of ways. VR can be leveraged in training medical students and residents on procedures for a more truly immersive experience before engaging with real patients.

For patients, these technologies can speed education about conditions or treatment plans.

Use of virtual cadavers in anatomy training is one specific example, which can be extended to practice sessions with an AR-enhanced smartphone.

(Excerpts from Deloitte Digital Trends report)

The University of Twente, Netherlands is developing an economical smartphone technology based on the usage of Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) and Augmented Reality (AR). This technology enables medical personnel to reconstruct 3D body sections quickly, by directing the smartphone to the area of interest.

Subject wise application:

Subject Purpose of the technology Features used

Chemistry

Provides an efficient way to represent and interact with molecules AR exhibits

Chemical engineering

Using a glass tabletop laden with coffee mugs and popsicle sticks, students rearranged the objects in a recent teaching exercise to simulate reactions in a real-life, sprawling chemical plant. Projector, AR table-top, QR coding

Mathematics

Aides teaching geometry, shapes, area etc AR and MR

Geography

Facilitates virtual tours; enables visualising different flora and fauna. To a certain level, immersive aspect lets students experience air pressure or view how a water cycle is complete. AR, VR and MR

History

To gather information and enhance the experience of visitors to cultural organisations (museums and archaeological sites) Mobile AR educational games

Biology

To teach participants that habitats are connected like links in a chain (food chain)
Facilitates students to view micro-organisms and their characteristics without the help of microscope (to an extent)
AR

Physics

To overlay graphics on top of the physical props to visualize these forces (speed, velocity, acceleration, pressure, friction, energy changes) invisible to the human eye Augmented video, video conferencing, tracked physical props (e.g. toy cars)

Architecture

Enables 3D visualisation and walk-throughs of cites;

helps assess structural worthiness, measure area and volume;

aides error correction in draft plans easily with its layered approach
from lighting to flooring to foundations – it will also let designers test out environments before actually building them

AR, VR and MR

Astronomy

To show augmented views of the celestial bodies and support learning using spatial visual guides and views from a terrestrial observer AR and VR

Medicine

Enables complete learning of body parts from the external skin to internal organs;
facilitates in learning more on surgical points;
virtual cadavers help students overcome the fear of surgery;

virtual reality provides medical and dental students a safe and controlled environment to practice surgeries and procedures, allowing them to make mistakes without having any impact on an actual patient, and prepare for any unexpected situations.

AR for body over-lay

Holo-lens assisted surgery in VR

MR

Journalism

Will aid in separating verified and unverified news information;
news aggregators will also help identify a breaking news through social media and other related uploads before the first official news is out.
AI

 

The way forward:

Technologies such as AR, VR, MR, AI etc are fast changing the face of learning and education. Integration of these technologies benefits teachers along with students. With the aid of technology like AR, visualisation of subject matter improves. Teachers can impart knowledge and facilitate learning in a simple way.

Use of technology in learning should be focussed on student centred learning. As observed earlier, these have vast use in almost every field of work. These technologies have become the new basic skillset to work around just like emails and mobile apps.

Businesses are adopting AR and VR to enhance processes. They have proved to save time, cut costs and increase efficiency.

As disruptive technologies grow, thousands of jobs will be created, and several others’ skill sets will widen. Introduction to these technology concepts from school will better prepare students for a digital world ahead.

 

With excerpts from 1, 2, 3

Frontier Technologies – saving lives

Immersive technology in healthcare

Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) – the immersive technologies are healthcare’s fastest growing med-tech that are saving lives. From their early research to pilot(s) and beyond, they have become mainstream currently.

A look at some of the flag-ship medical research and methodology in place:

 

 

Source: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Images courtesy: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Rising with the realities

Vivek Aiyer, Founder and CEO of Appearition spoke to one of India’s leading newspaper The Hindu, on Immersive Technology and what it takes to be an AR-VR creator:

How do you get in on the action in this futuristic industry of AR and VR?

The augmented (AR) and virtual reality (VR) market is expected to reach $162 billion by 2020 from a mere $6.1 billion in 2016, predicts IDC. Although these immersive technologies have been around for a while, it is only recently that the enterprises and industries have adapted these in their processes.

Globally, it is one of the fastest growing computing platforms. This means, thousands of jobs will be created, and several other skill sets will widen.

What it takes

“An AR-VR content creator should have an innate sense of curiosity and the ability to convey through a visual medium,” says Vivek Aiyer, Founder and CEO of Appearition, a global AR-VR based company. These technologies are a medium for problem-solving and process enhancement. More than software and hardware, these technologies are human- based and hence understanding the audience is very important.

A content developer of AR/VR would be extending from other disciplines, 2D illustration and animation and 3D modelling and animation. Gamification and content development for games plays a huge role in picking up skills. One can either be a gaming content developer or enterprise AR-VR developer. Content developers would be expected to align their skills within the tools a company has selected to use as the AR/VR engine, that is, most often Unity (C# / JS) or Unreal (C++ / Blueprint), native (JAVA / JS / XCode). They should be proficient in the use of the tools that deliver 2D content, such as Adobe After Effects, Adobe Animate, Animatron, Moho (Anime Studio) and so on.

Artists using 3D modelling software to build objects must be well-versed in rigging, the process of creating a skeleton for a 3D model so that it can move. There are various tools in 3D creation and animation which an AR/VR content developer should be able to use, such as Maya, 3DS Max, Blender, Motion Builder, Arnold, and so on.

Creators should aim at developing a vertical scrolling-based storytelling, the basis of VR content creation. India has a great advantage in the content space.

In terms of the digital assets, the only difference between AR and VR assets is how the app developer implements them at the time of rendering.

Profiles that suit

Any normal design degree, with good coding skills and strong written and oral skills will form the core of an AR-VR creator. “It is important to develop a core base of knowledge on the mentioned skills which can then be applied across the immersive technology.” Creating a compelling content is the need of the hour in this space. The industry not only requires programmers, but also content creators. For instance, IIT-M teaches its Applied Mechanics students the basics of Haptics through several subjects like psychophysics or bio-mechanics. In the near future, there is a possibility of a dedicated degree in this space.”

Building a portfolio

“As a student, it is important to build a wide knowledge base. Get into the habit of reading journals and technical documents, stay abreast with the latest technology news,” says Aiyer. Technology in this space is ever evolving; hence; it is important to keep oneself updated, skill-wise.

He says, “Build a portfolio by trying to come up with solutions for problems. AR and VR in the enterprise space is all about providing a utility-based solution and not a fun work element.” It is important that students think on contextual data.

From June, Appearition will conduct workshops on basics of immersive technology for school students. Interested students and schools can register at info@appearition.com

Frontier technologies – Future beckons

Mouli Ganguly, Member, Board of Advisors, talks on Industry 4.0, Digital Transformation, Frontier Technologies and more:

  1. What are some technologies that you think will play a huge role in Digital Transformation and why?

All of them play a role in terms of Digital Transformation. So, let us take an industrial example. Dump trucks used in mining have huge tyres. Their worth is about a million odd dollars and some of their tyres cost up to $100k. Now it is important to see the level of productivity an application can deliver. The benefits are already clear & compelling.

Every modern piece of truck has got transponders all over the place. That kicks in the IoT element. This enables us to track what it is doing by tracking the signals received. With AI and insights, what we can do with the data coming through is, collect and put them in a place. We can decide here is what I want to get the data or do something about it.

With AR, VR and MR, you render the whole application to how the user can best use it, with data and insights. For example, you could present the same information that you’re collecting via transponders to the truck drivers in a manner where he can see the whole environment around him. You can set it up, such that language is not a barrier. In India, for instance, truck drivers driving cross-country speak different languages. Irrespective of whatever language one speaks, they can all see an image, interpret & take decisions. Every driver knows what a boulder is. Or what are the factors that may damage the dumpster or damage the tyres or something else. Whilst sitting inside the dumpster, they may not be able to view everything through naked eye.

“Seeing the information presented through Virtual or Augmented reality enables him to make better decisions.”

Another way to grasp all this up – you see a control room can observe the movements of a dumpster. They receive the information from transponders and visualise the data and interpret the implications that arise from it. They can then come up with solutions like specific risk issues or actions that need to be taken. A team from the customer & Appearition has to plan this out.

In terms of Blockchain, it makes sure that a certain event, transaction or data, is stamped as authentic. It is not widely used yet. There are restrictions on its usage or application. But for transactions of high value, this technology not only gives you an experience but also makes the transaction very safe and auditable. It also facilitates to build a record as to who did what at exactly when. This can also act as an audit trail for any purpose required. It is a foul-proof way to keep track of things. The transaction can be financial or otherwise.

So that is how all the technologies can play a role in Digital Transformation. Often a combination of these technologies that answers / solves a business problem.

  1. What will be the road-map of early adapters vs cautious players?

Typically, early adapters are an organisation’s visionary. They are in the very senior position. Also, in a generational sense, say between gen X, gen Y or the middle aged people, there are several technology gaps. Kids born after 2000 basically grew up with screens. Just like millennials grew up with the PCs. Every time a new technology is introduced, you think of things in a very different way. For example, in my generation of baby boomers, , people would write text for a power point presentation. Whereas, these days, a presentation is far more experiential.

In an organisational context, the gap is often at thinking through the process change or adaption for an idea.  If the plan is not backed by experience or relevant subject matter expertise, it will fall through.

As an early adapter, the visionaries come up with ideas. The cautious players are the ones who go through the practical things. So, they go through factors like business use case, defining what will change, how will it work, the change management and integration part of it, how to get data out of organisational system that exists, make sure that the data is accurate, quality is good.

Early adapters are analytical thinkers/dreamers. Cautious people on the other hand, achieve dreamers’ dreams. This kcan take a very long time. Now, where an organisation is driven by a visionary, often, you get things moving simply because he has got an idea that he wants to make it happen. And he (CEO/COO) will tell somebody typically that, ‘look I just want to make it happen. Work as a team and make it happen’.

Facebook phenomenon

For an early adapter enterprise, if you get the vision right, you get a first mover advantage over others. For instance, the Facebook phenomenon. They have created an entirely new business. Whereas sometimes, early adapters who did not plan well have gone bust. Because, they have placed some bets that have gone awfully wrong. And this has sort of impacted their existing business, customers and whole the lot. Cautious players tend to be thoughtful followers. They let others experiment and use those learnings in their business. They try to keep their profitability high and ensure quality, risk management & repeatability, so thatcustomer engagement does not take a hit.

  1. In this process, how can an enterprise build its internal and external stakeholders’ digital IQ?

There are whole lot of methodologies. In my view really simple. The agenda very much is a COO/CFO/CIO/CMO/CPO idea. The CEO says this is what we need to do. The CMO then says, this is how we want to market it. This is the experience we want to provide. The CPO Says here is the culture or context in which I want my people to operate. Those are the three elements – the customers, the culture, the strategic direction and somewhere in between there is an elephant in the room, the digital space. Compliance, security, all those kinds of things. All this has to hang together be funded effectively and provide return to the investors, That is why you need a special type of CFO for the digital businesses. That is very important in terms of creating the digital IQ.

You drive the innovation, which is the business agenda. Secondly, you need to be agile. Agility is where you can own up to your mistakes quickly when needed and at a low cost.  The whole team, not just some champions  must work together on an agile manner. We need collaboration within the organisation and with the suppliers & customers. Within the compliance ecosystem the regulatory authority, and any number of agencies are there, because the laws haven’t caught up in Digital yet. And the next comes the partners. Because no one organisation can do everything by themselves. It is very, very important for the partners to work together. Again, look at what Appearition is doing. They work with a whole lot of partners to deliver what must be delivered. And, at another level, the IQ is built through great culture of innovation and risk taking.

The first question you ask is why are you doing it? What is the innovation? Why am I doing it? What difference will it make? And the ability to execute, in my mind is the other side of the equation. The CIO, the guy whom implements the technology. The CFO, the guy who checks out the money, burning millions of dollars, putting things at risk. Those kinds of functions become responsible of every action. So, the whole thing is a question of balance.

The ability to execute the vision is possibly the biggest challenge of the Exec team.

  1. What will the role of data analytics be in this revolution?

If you take the first thing that comes out in the digital world, it is data. There is so much data in every aspect of our life, every moment. We are being absolutely bombarded with data. Our memory spans have reduced. In today’s mindset, I don’t think people have the patience to read a booklet. This data is compressed and made consumable through AI and Analytics. This is turned into information. But then, to turn it into information, you need to know, what information you were after. You need to take the data in a certain way. From information, comes knowledge. Then you personalise it. Then you look at the information and say, I’ve read the report, what I’ve learnt out of the report is this, this and that. And then, beyond that comes very, very content specific, decisions.

For instance, if you are an insurance company and you want to know the information on who are the people who do not have an insurance and are most likely to become my customers? And if there are certain attributes that you identify, you may decide whether it is important or not and do something with it.

2/2 of his exclusive interview. Click here to read the first part.

Industry 4.0 – Time to reassess business plans

Mouli Ganguly, Member, Board of Advisors, talks on Industry 4.0, Digital Transformation and more:

  1. How has market reacted to digital transformation so far? What are some factors that seem to aid it/ factors that act as a barrier?

Introduction of computers in the 80s and internet in the 90s were digital transformations (DT). These transformations speed up an existing process in their own way.

Currently, with Augmented Reality (AR), Virtual Reality (VR), Mixed Reality (MR), Artificial Intelligence (AI), Internet of Things (IoT), Big Data etc, we are heading to the third wave in digital change. With this change, content reach has become faster and more specific to the user’s individual & specific context.

There is a question of what is the hype and what is the reality? The hype is often an expectation that Everything will turn digital from day one. But the reality is it takes a long, long time.

Digital disruption is when the whole user experience changes. When you look at the current technologies like AR-VR, you are in an immersive environment. The second thing that changes in a business is convenience. It gets faster and better. Take for instance YouTube, people are not wholly dependent on it for video services. We have now got other video streaming options. From being costly and time-consuming to produce a video, now they’ve become so simple.  Within a span of five years, existing technologies have changed so much.

In the residential space, AR-VR is already there. If you look at smartphones or movies, almost every movie has a VR effect in it. Whereas in the enterprise phase, it is happening far more slowly due to change management issues. There are a whole lot of processes, policies, rules that play out. These multi-factor influences act as barriers, at times.

Take a look at this scenario:

On a personal level, if you see a 3-D glass that you fancy, you just go ahead and buy it and try it and see. But in the enterprise phase, we cannot change what we do on a day-to-day basis, immediately. It is a gradual process to adopt changes and involves formal change management. Enterprises don’t have individual decisions like personal buyer choices. A new technology adoption must act in a certain business standard. In an enterprise space, one person cannot just act on it or start using something. There are other people involved. This is a huge barrier in adopting or initiating digital transformation.

  1. If you were to chart a blueprint for an enterprise’s digital transformation, what actions would it typically involve?

Adopting new technologies to businesses happen if there is a clear benefit. Unlike personal choices, a business cannot adopt a technology or a process without a defined benefit. There should be a strategy or a growth plan that cites the benefits.

Benefits can be divided into three: Either the customer or staff experience the product or service delivers is much superior leading to increased loyalty and willingness to adopt from them. Since organisations measure customer satisfaction, this is an inclusive environment.

Next one on the list is Product or process improvement. Take for instance claims processing in an Insurance company. It is quite difficult organising in person, especially if the person has availed trauma insurance. In a digital world, you can have a number of different tools from virtual assistance to people working in collaborative environments to remote diagnostics with telemedicine, all of these improves the overall process.

Enterprises must include the market & customer in its product development. It is easier to create a digital product. One can quickly create a product and launch it and test it as a POC (proof of concept), before scaling up or canning it all together.  Therefore, the whole product cycle in the market is faster than before. Through failure, you learn, Fail fast and fail without incurring a high cost or brand damage and you will innovate with successful offerings.

Finally comes the cost reduction factor. Basically, several things drive digital adoption. You grow the experience, generate customers, grow staff loyalty and therefore get more market opportunities. You get market opportunities to get new products by reducing the cycle time to market, your process has changed, you change the format quickly. And as your cost reduces, you become more productive. This sort of drives some of the opportunity.

Now, what is the big risk that you face while doing so?

Benefits, use cases & training/change management needs are not clear. For instance, when we say I’ll improve the claims processing experience in an insurance company, one needs to clearly articulate what is the use case. What is the customer roadmap of the journey? How the customer uses the new digitised transformational services that you provide. Then one has to map it all the way. At each point, you have to state what is different. How or where will I be delivering this service and how will the business be using it. It is not a technology or process issue. Business must very clearly define the benefits they will get.

Now, how do you do it?

Firstly, create a simple proof of concept. And these concepts have been around for a long time, but very, very quickly you spin something up like Appearition is doing at the moment, we can create an experience for the customer to show them the actual benefits very quickly.

The next thing that comes is change management. You have to say, if we are going to do things differently, digital is to be applied on a day to day basis, how do you make sure that when either our customers or suppliers or staff use it, how’d they be trained, accept it and use it. And most importantly, everybody in the eco-system, i.e. the staff, customers, suppliers should be able to deal with the change. This change management leads to a fully functional prototype. Proof of concepts at a very low price, say 30-50k dollars, roughly, you show them how it is done, from there we move to a fully functional prototype. From the prototype, we get a use case development.

In our design, we use tools like machine learning, artificial intelligence, data from the Internet of things and analytics to continually improve the experience.

The last one, which must be designed in terms of the blueprint, is integration. Every organisation has a whole lot of legacies. Because nobody is working in a vacuum. The new systems have to interwork with the legacy in most cases. This becomes a difficult, costly & cumbersome process.

3. What are some of the opportunities and risks that enterprises will face whilst adopting it?

Whatever digital services one provides, one must draw the data from those existing legacies. One of the elements to add to the risk is realisation. Because, sometimes, some firms do not have a clear strategy on how they want to go digital. They just dump and start an initiative without a strategy. So, if you get an application up and running, it will look very nice and appealing to whoever designed it and they will think this will change the world. But if there is no change management to support it, the customers, the staff are not wedded to it. It hasn’t been well thought through.

 

Follow this space for Part-2 of this interview.

Augmented and Virtual Reality Education – The future of classrooms

In our last series on AR-VR in Education, we touched on the basics of these technologies in education, how teachers’ roles can be shaped to make them better educators and how students can benefit from immersive technology.

Augmented and Virtual Reality are no longer in their stages of infancy. They are widely being used across multiple verticals.

A Lenovo research found that almost 50% of teachers estimate VR will be commonplace in schools in the next five years.

(Image Courtesy: thinkmobiles.com)

AR and VR in education boosts learning from a multi-fold perspective:

  1. increases student engagement
  2. increases knowledge retention
  3. facilitates holistic learning
  4. reduce classroom disruption
  5. encourages collaborative and individual learning
  6. enables teachers to better prepare lessons
  7. creates an immersive environment
  8. easily explain abstract content

AR-VR apps used at classrooms:

  • Wynn Middle School, USA has successfully tested the uses of AR for cross-curricular projects where students created AR posters to demonstrate physical activity using the ACES method (answer, cite, explain, summarize) for written responses. This student centric activity has made learning more engaging and fun say teachers.
  • Dubai British School, UAE has been using VR to facilitate virtual tours to aid students in learning. For instance, travel to Africa to explore the African desert is near to impossible to arrange. Or viewing the Mars orbit line in a Geography class. VR has been bridging this gap in imagination and enables students visualise them, thereby enabling comprehensive learning.
  • Magic Mirror pilot – A group of anatomy specialists tested an interactive and personalised AR system to facilitate learning in medical school. This system behaves as a “magic mirror” which allows personalized in‐situ visualization of anatomy on the user’s body. Furthermore, the app displays medical images, and 3D models of organs that the user can interact with. The results showed 91.7% approval for the capability of AR technology to display organs in 3D, and 86.1% approval for the educational value of the technology.
  • University of Rochester, USA simulated reactions in a chemical plant using an AR table-top developed in-house. They are using AR to create new types of STEM undergraduate labs that were not possible earlier. Students used coffee mugs and popsicle sticks to simulate reactions in real-life, sprawling chemical plant.
  • University of Nebraska Medical Center, USA They have been using head mounted AR glasses and large 3-D video displays to simulate realistic body parts for med school students. Sensing huge potential in this space, the university is building a state-of-the-art dedicated 3-D simulation centre which is expected to have the world’s first five-sided laser cave.

Studies suggest students can absorb a visual scene within 0.01 seconds! Moving towards a fully digital world, AR and VR act as the window to this visual sense. Students get a first experience and wholly understand a concept. This method of teaching promotes visual learning beyond just kinder-garden.

Immersive technologies are set to change to completely revamp future ways of learning and teaching by bringing the world inside the four-walls.

First Ever Unity Center of Excellence in Australia focused on Augmented Reality

First-of-its-kind partnership enables enterprise success with digital transformation

Melbourne & Singapore, April 4th, 2018 — Unity Technologies (​https://unity3d.com/​), creator of the world’s most widely used real-time development platform, and Appearition (http://appearition.com/), provider of augmented reality solutions for enterprises, today announced a partnership to launch the first ever Unity Center of Excellence (CoE) for enterprises in Australia. Corporations worldwide looking to introduce innovative solutions, now have an augmented reality-focused CoE as a resource to address corporate pain points.

“Since Unity’s inception, our mission has been to democratize development, solve hard problems and enable success. We’re excited to partner with Appearition because the company shares our passion through its dedication to the development of augmented reality solutions,” said Hubert Larenaudie, President APAC, Unity Technologies. “We hope corporations that are tackling issues with digital transformation benefit from the solutions and support from partners like Appearition who are using Unity’s technology to enable the success of enterprises.”

The Unity CoE highlights the enterprise demand and growth of augmented reality solutions and the move towards digital transformation. The partnership is a significant step forward for both companies enabling corporate digital transformation and fostering an ecosystem to encourage knowledge sharing of best practices.

“Appearition’s mission is to enable the success of others, a mission that we gladly share with Unity. We pride ourselves on building innovative products to help enterprises succeed,” said Vivek Aiyer, Founder and CEO of Appearition. “Appearition is delighted to partner with Unity to launch the first ever Center of Excellence in Australia. With our global presence, we are excited to continue to deliver end-to-end-deployment through the entire business technology lifecycle.”

About Appearition

Appearition was established with the vision to enable its customers’ success by developing and deploying Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) software solutions across verticals. Over the years, Appearition has developed and constantly improved what it calls “Green Spot Process” for digital transformation projects, to deliver and obtain user acceptance of the proposed solutions. On a more technical front, a proprietary, cloud based platform, Enterprise Management System (EMS), has specifically been designed for the B2B and B2B2C segments. The EMS features a state-of-the-art SDK as well as an API to connect to multiple data sources and make developers’ lives easier. It ultimately delivers dynamic and personalized experiences in AR and/or VR environments in real-time. Appearition’s team of global experts in their respective fields, share the ambition to be the leading supplier of immersive technologies and services to the global market. A dedicated, in-house R/D team operates out of Melbourne and entertains various international research partnerships with leading universities. Appearition is headquartered in Melbourne, Australia with offices in the US, as well as in India. Opening of additional global offices to be announced later this year.

For more information, visit www.appearition.com.

About Unity Technologies

Unity is the creator of the world’s most widely-used real-time 3D development platform, giving developers around the world the tools to create rich, interactive 2D, 3D, VR and AR experiences. The company’s 500+ person engineering team keeps Unity at the bleeding edge of technology by working alongside partners such as Google, Facebook, Oculus and Microsoft to ensure optimized support for the latest releases and platforms. Games and experiences made with Unity have reached 3 billion devices worldwide and were installed more than 24 billion times in the last 12 months. Unity’s renowned flexibility gives developers the power to target and optimize their creations for Unity employs an “write once, publish everywhere” approach, enabling developers to target 25+ platforms including Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Gameroom (Facebook), SteamVR (PC & Mac), Oculus, PSVR, Gear VR, HoloLens, ARKit (Apple), ARCore (Google) and more. Unity also offers solutions and services for connecting with audiences including Unity Ads, Unity Analytics, Unity Asset Store, Unity Cloud Build, Unity Collaborate, Unity Connect and Unity Certification.

For more information, visit www.unity3d.com and to see the latest games and experiences created in Unity, go to https://unity.com/madewith.

To know more about the Centre of Excellence, visit https://unity3d.com/coe/appearition.